wildlife biology @ UM

mypubliclands:

On this day in 2006, Congress passed the Northern California Coastal Wild Heritage Wilderness Act which designated 42,585 acres of the King Range National Conservation Area as wilderness.

The 60,000-acre King Range NCA encompasses 35 miles of remote coastline known as California’s Lost Coast. The mountains are a mix of Douglas-fir forest, chaparral, and grassland, providing habitat for blacktailed deer, elk, black bear and nearly 300 species of native and migratory birds.

CLICK HERE to learn more.

Photos by Bob Wick, Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands

2 days ago · 110 notes · Reblog

How to influence nesting behavior of migratory songbirds

Article and Photos by Karolina Fierro-C.

Maple drainages along the Mogollon Rim, in the Coconino National Forest, are quiet during the cold and snowy months. It is possible to only hear the territorial calls of elk, coyotes and ravens. However in spring, the forest is filled with wonderful sounds: it is the reproductive season for songbirds. Hundreds of them arrive from Mexico and Central America, and others from lower elevations where they elude the snow and find plenty of food from September to March every year. They come back to the forest looking for their old or new territories in the maple drainages.

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UM Ph.D. Student, Will Janousek, shares his story on Climate Boot Camp!

At the end of August I had the opportunity to represent the Wildlife Biology Program at the Northwest Climate Science Center Climate Boot Camp held at Silver Falls State Park in central Oregon. Climate Boot Camp is designed to bring early professionals and graduate students together to share in an immersive experience focusing on current issues related to climate change with particular emphasis on how climate change will affect the ecosystems and people living in the Northwestern US. Throughout the week we heard firsthand knowledge from local community leaders, indigenous tribe representatives, and state and federal biologists about the effects of climate change already being observed in the region.

One of the most memorable experiences for me was taking a kayak trip into Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge to visit the field sites of Kevin Buffington, a Ph.D. student from Oregon State University. Intertidal habitats (mudflats and salt marshes) like those found in Siletz Bay face drastic transformations with the projected rise in sea level due to climate change. Kevin is interested in how those transformations will take place focusing on the ability of different plant communities to survive changes in sea level. As participants of the workshop we were very lucky to not only hear about Kevin’s work but also experience it firsthand.

I was able to attend the workshop in large part through financial support from the Wildlife Biology Program. With the program’s help the knowledge gained and the collaborative relationships established during my time attending the Climate Boot Camp will no doubt extend to and support the graduate work I intend to accomplish during my time here at the University of Montana.

-Will Janousek, 1st Year Ph.D. Student

birdandmoon:

It’s time for winter - choose your strategy wisely!

Find this comic on my site here.

Pulling out a comic from my favorite artist to brighten up this Monday! Hope everyone is getting ready for the impending cold weather that approaches.

rhamphotheca:

The Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus)

… is a small wader/shorebird. This phalarope breeds in the Arctic regions of North America and Eurasia. It is migratory, and, unusually for a wader/shorebird, winters at sea on tropical oceans.

The typical avian sex roles are reversed in the three phalarope species. Females are larger and more brightly coloured than males. The females pursue and fight over males, and will defend their mate from other females until the clutch is complete and the male begins incubation. The males perform all incubation and chick-rearing activities, while the females may attempt to find another mate…

(read more: Wikipedia)

images: female - Andreas Trepte; male - Teddy Llovet; female and chick- US Fish & Wildlife Service

 Western Division of the American Fisheries SocietyWhen thinking about the American Fisheries Society (AFS), Mexico doesn’t usually come to mind. Well, that’s all changed for me after attending the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society (WDAFS) Annual Meeting in Mazatlan, Mexico as a representative of the UM Student Subunit of AFS. The meeting, a joint effort between WDAFS and the Mexico Chapter of the AFS, was entitled “Rethinking Fisheries Sustainability: The Future of Fisheries Science” and brought fish minded folks in from around the globe for five days of events this last April.Symposia were organized to inform researchers, professors, biologists and students on topics ranging from the conservation of the Cutthroat trout we find in MT, to the Giant Oceanic Manta Ray – the largest type of ray in the world, found as far away as New Zealand. I learned about not just the different management practices and issues in the West but also emerging work in entirely different ecosystems. I met a researcher from South America who is discovering new ways to track long-lived catfish that migrate the length of the Amazon River!The Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Student Subunit made sure the American students felt welcome with social events and helped us enjoy Mazatlan. From dinner and music on the beach to fireworks exploding out over the surf, no opportunity to take in the beauty of Mexico was wasted.Despite all the cutting edge science, meeting new like-minded professionals and the gorgeous sunsets over the Gulf of California the highlight of my trip happened at the WDAFS Business Luncheon.Tracy Wendt, UMAFS President and I accepted the 2014 WDAFS Award for Outstanding Student Subunit from Past-President Tina Swanson. UMAFS has been working hard to increase our presence both on the UM campus and in the greater Missoula community and to be recognized for the hard work our members do with an award like this is an amazing.Overall, the 2014 WDAFS Annual Meeting in Mazatlan was a great success. I can only hope that UMAFS can be at the 2015 Annual Meeting to accept our next award!Katie Rayfield, UMAFS Vice-President
Tracy Wendt, UMAFS President (L), and Katie Rayfield, UMAFS Vice-President (R), accept the 2014 WDAFS Award for Outstanding Student Subunit from WDAFS Past President Tina Swanson in Mazatlan, Mexico. 
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 Western Division of the American Fisheries Society

When thinking about the American Fisheries Society (AFS), Mexico doesn’t usually come to mind. Well, that’s all changed for me after attending the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society (WDAFS) Annual Meeting in Mazatlan, Mexico as a representative of the UM Student Subunit of AFS. The meeting, a joint effort between WDAFS and the Mexico Chapter of the AFS, was entitled “Rethinking Fisheries Sustainability: The Future of Fisheries Science” and brought fish minded folks in from around the globe for five days of events this last April.

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jtotheizzoe:

Bat vs. Raptor

Here’s a special scene that didn’t end up in this week’s bat video. This awesome action kinda snuck up on me, so it’s a little blurry. Let’s just say that when a raptor goes up against a tornado of bats, everyone wins. The mammals aren’t the only ones who got dinner that night :)

Enjoy!

(By the way, this is a perfect example of a predator avoidance strategy called the “dilution effect”)

Blackfoot-Clearwater Wire Roll-up 2014

 This weekend I got together with the University of Montana chapter of the Wildlife Society, the Backcountry Horsemen of Montana, and Jay Kolbe of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks. Our goal was to help remove barbed wire from the Blackfoot-Clearwater wildlife management area.

While the wire had been down for numerous years (as was evident by some of it being buried under ground) it still left a less-than-pleasant mark on the landscape. It not only acts as a deterrent for wildlife to travel freely across the area, but it also generates wildlife and domestic animal fatalities for those which get caught in the wires. These qualities are what generate interest in removing them.

Due to our extensive use of barbed wire from the mid-1800’s on, there are still miles of this stuff hanging out on the American landscape. Nonetheless, with another look at the impressive turnout of this year’s Wire Roll, I think we’re making amazing progress at the Blackfoot-Clearwater!

Tomorrow is National Public Land Day

This mean, all national parks and public lands do no charge their entrance fee. So for those of you worth access, go out and enjoy our American Public Lands! I know I am!

Undergraduate Research Highlight : A study on cattle grazing.

We often see our graduate students up here on the blog, so today I decided it was time to put the light on our undergrads. Jason Hanlon is nearing the end of his stay here at the university, and for the summer he was given the great opportunity to spearhead his own research project. Observing the differences in small mammal presence between watering holes for cattle, and areas with minimal water, where grazing is reduced. He is still reviewing the data that he has collected, which I hope to post up sometime in the future.