wildlife biology @ UM

nubbsgalore:

photos by jeff cremer of orange julia and sulfur yellow butterflies drinking the salty tears of a tracajá turtle in the peruvian amazon. sodium is a scarce resource in the western amazon, where there is little mineral content to rain water, so the butterflies have learned to get it where they can. luckily for the butterflies, the turtles don’t much mind, despite deriving no reciprocal benefit themselves. (see also: previous turtle posts)

While this isn’t in Montana, I couldn’t pass up sharing these lovely photos.

It’s a steep learning curve to work on moose in Eastern Washington. Getting close to female moose and their calves during the most dangerous time of year is hard enough, add in their preference for the thick forests, high-elevations, and remote locations… and you have the recipe for tough, moose, fieldwork. Some days are unproductive, despite miles of driving and hiking, but others are filled with amazing and memorable experiences, such as viewing mother moose and their precious newborns. I am nearly finished confirming the presence of calves for the 25 radio-collared moose in my study area, but next year will be an even bigger challenge as there will be twice as many moose to track and monitor for reproduction and survival! Dealing with private landowners, timber companies, state agencies and other wildlife studies in the area has been complex and educational. As this first field season comes to a close, I find myself looking forward to seeing all these amazing animals again next year.

James Goerz, University of Montana student
Graduate Research Assistant
Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit

North American Congress of Conservation Biology Coverage

Conflict, Concern, and Chaos, Oh My!

Today was a pretty busy day. Going between a few panels (successfully this time) I’m going to have to split up my posts. Tonight I’ll go over a fascinating bit of research done by a professor mentioned on here before, tomorrow we’ll look at concerns over microfilament twine, and the last day, Thursday, I’ll have something up about the multiple human-wildlife conflict talks I got to. You’re in for a real treat if I do say so myself, so settle down and read on!

Read More

North American Congress of Conservation Biology Coverage (A little delayed)

Sorry for the late post, everyone. Today was a great day at the NACCB but you will have to wait till tomorrow to hear about what was going on. In fact, there was so much, I’m going to need to span it over a few days! So, for tonight, I thought I’d show you the lovely entrance to the University Center where the event was held on the University of Montana campus (whoop whoop) and a quick shot of one of our school’s graduate students, James Goerz, who you will be hearing from in the near future concerning some moose research he’s conducting. 

Hope you’re all enjoying your Tuesday!

North American Congress of Conservation Biology Coverage

Reconsidering Dualistic Thinking on Non-Native Species and Their Role in Conservation

A good title to a pretty good panel. After shuffling in, it didn’t take long for the room to fill up and settle in for the some three hours of talking that was about to take place. While I left early to try and get into another panel (which ultimately failed) the lectures were impressive, particularly the first and last one I sat in for. Due to the nature of the lectures (they covered similar topics) I am going to briefly go over what I took away from them and mention the ones I feel were truly noteworthy. So let’s just dive in.

Read More

Coming Soon: Updates Concerning the North American Congress of Conservation Biology

Yours truly got to attend a few events at the meeting they had here in Missoula. Later tonight I’ll cover a few panels I sat in on, so no worries if you weren’t able to go, we’ve got your back.

birdandmoon:

I love salamanders. This comic is for my herpetology buddies, and for anyone who has spent days trying to get that slime off their hands.
high resolution →

birdandmoon:

I love salamanders. This comic is for my herpetology buddies, and for anyone who has spent days trying to get that slime off their hands.

"We have cherished the Northern Rockies. Now it is your life’s landscape. Keep these wildlands and all their wildlife forever intact.” - Earle and Pattie Layser
high resolution →

"We have cherished the Northern Rockies. Now it is your life’s landscape. Keep these wildlands and all their wildlife forever intact.” - Earle and Pattie Layser

The Forestry Building Main Entrance @ The University of Montana
Well guys, I’ll be honest. I’m currently trapped in Wisconsin due to flight issues, but I snapped this photo of the building many of our Wildlifers see every day on campus. I’ve always admired it and when I return I’ll try and get a shot of the building itself. 

To think, this building was once just a small shack… oh how far we’ve come. 
high resolution →

The Forestry Building Main Entrance @ The University of Montana

Well guys, I’ll be honest. I’m currently trapped in Wisconsin due to flight issues, but I snapped this photo of the building many of our Wildlifers see every day on campus. I’ve always admired it and when I return I’ll try and get a shot of the building itself. 

To think, this building was once just a small shack… oh how far we’ve come. 

mypubliclands:

On this day in history, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Act into law in 1958.  The act became effective on January 3, 1959.  As part of the Act, Alaska was granted more than 100 million acres of public land.

Featured here, the beautiful lands along the Dalton Highway in Alaska.

Photos by Bob Wick, Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands

A wonderful bit of history from the Bureau of Land Management. Lovely photos as well! Keep it up, guys.