wildlife biology @ UM

becausebirds:

Goshawk testing its flying capabilities. It is shown flying through a circular opening, horizontal opening, vertical opening and a tunnel. [video]

Happy Birthday William Beebe (1877 - 1962)

I spotted that today was his birthday and I figured he’d be a fine man to speak of today. Born in Brooklyn, New York, it is believed that Beebe’s love for the natural world was created through the newly-founded American Museum of Natural History. His life, almost from day one, was devoted to exploring nature and it’s curiosities. From maintaining rare bird species held by the New York Zoological Park to, later in his life, traveling the world to document exotic birds; he was devoted to wildlife and it’s preservation. So, hat off to you, good sir, for having done the wildlife community a wonderful service. 

birdandmoon:

One of my older comics got posted on Boing Boing today! Hooray!
Note: I don’t actually think that evolution sucks, and I know this comic is entirely inaccurate, but I still wish I had a terror bird as a pet.
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birdandmoon:

One of my older comics got posted on Boing Boing today! Hooray!

Note: I don’t actually think that evolution sucks, and I know this comic is entirely inaccurate, but I still wish I had a terror bird as a pet.

wearemtblog:

The top of Mount Sentinel.
Then: 1903 biology class doing field work Now: 2014 trail runners enjoying the view

Baby photos of the University of Montana, for the world to see. Look how cute it was, now it’s all grown up and adult-like and stuff. Still beautiful, though!
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wearemtblog:

The top of Mount Sentinel.

Then: 1903 biology class doing field work 
Now: 2014 trail runners enjoying the view

Baby photos of the University of Montana, for the world to see. Look how cute it was, now it’s all grown up and adult-like and stuff. Still beautiful, though!

mypubliclands:

Kicking Off the Weekend with a Beauty Shot of the Centennial Mountains in Montana
This 28,000-acre mountain range, which forms the boundary between southwest Montana and Idaho, is some of southwest Montana’s wildest country. It is considered an important corridor for wildlife movement, providing an east-west trending mountain range connecting the Yellowstone Ecosystem with the rest of the northern Rocky Mountains. Abundant wildlife in the Centennial Mountains include moose, elk, deer, wolverines, badgers, black bears, a wide variety of birds, and occasionally wolves and grizzly bears.
About 60 miles of the 3,100-mile Continental Divide National Scenic Trail runs through the mountain range. The CDT through the Centennials is usually well-maintained, although natural events can change conditions rapidly. Several side trails provide access from both the Montana and Idaho sides of the CDT. Wildflowers are especially abundant during the mid- to late summer.
Visit BLM Montana’s website to plan your visit: http://on.doi.gov/1pS1ZRW
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mypubliclands:

Kicking Off the Weekend with a Beauty Shot of the Centennial Mountains in Montana

This 28,000-acre mountain range, which forms the boundary between southwest Montana and Idaho, is some of southwest Montana’s wildest country. It is considered an important corridor for wildlife movement, providing an east-west trending mountain range connecting the Yellowstone Ecosystem with the rest of the northern Rocky Mountains. Abundant wildlife in the Centennial Mountains include moose, elk, deer, wolverines, badgers, black bears, a wide variety of birds, and occasionally wolves and grizzly bears.

About 60 miles of the 3,100-mile Continental Divide National Scenic Trail runs through the mountain range. The CDT through the Centennials is usually well-maintained, although natural events can change conditions rapidly. Several side trails provide access from both the Montana and Idaho sides of the CDT. Wildflowers are especially abundant during the mid- to late summer.

Visit BLM Montana’s website to plan your visit: http://on.doi.gov/1pS1ZRW

wearemtblog:

One of the coolest hidden features on UM’s campus is the Philip L. Wright Zoological Museum. The museum contains more than 24,000 specimens of vertebrates, including birds, mammals and fish. It is the largest zoological collection in Montana and one of the major zoological collections representing the Northern Rocky Mountains.

These photos feature some of the beautiful specimens in the collection, as well as former curator David Dyer and Emily Graslie before she moved her educational YouTube show “The Brain Scoop” to the renowned Field Museum in Chicago.

Photos by Todd Goodrich, originally shot for Montanan: The Magazine of The University of Montana.

Keep tuned folks, the Zoological Museum may have gotten an Instagram. We’ll let you know when it’s official. 

conservationbiologist:

Sex, leks, and video tape - say what?!? Scientists are using “fembots” (eat your heart out, Austin Powers!) to study the mating behavior of greater sage-grouse as part of a larger effort to conserve the species. Read more at 1.usa.gov/1y3RPmk and watch some amazing fembot footage at bit.ly/VTMn7N (Gail Patricelli / UC Davis) #USFWS #sagegrouse #conservation #nature #lek #AustinPowers #technology #science #birding #birds

Whoa, look what they’re doing out there! Some awesome robo-birds.
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conservationbiologist:

Sex, leks, and video tape - say what?!? Scientists are using “fembots” (eat your heart out, Austin Powers!) to study the mating behavior of greater sage-grouse as part of a larger effort to conserve the species. Read more at 1.usa.gov/1y3RPmk and watch some amazing fembot footage at bit.ly/VTMn7N (Gail Patricelli / UC Davis) #USFWS #sagegrouse #conservation #nature #lek #AustinPowers #technology #science #birding #birds

Whoa, look what they’re doing out there! Some awesome robo-birds.

a-mongrel:

Hmmm… Wonder what kind of person owns this library.

Does this look like some of your shelves? I hope so. I think I spot an old field journal in the mix!
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a-mongrel:

Hmmm… Wonder what kind of person owns this library.

Does this look like some of your shelves? I hope so. I think I spot an old field journal in the mix!

1 week ago · 4 notes · Reblog
#wildlife #books 

nubbsgalore:

photos by jeff cremer of orange julia and sulfur yellow butterflies drinking the salty tears of a tracajá turtle in the peruvian amazon. sodium is a scarce resource in the western amazon, where there is little mineral content to rain water, so the butterflies have learned to get it where they can. luckily for the butterflies, the turtles don’t much mind, despite deriving no reciprocal benefit themselves. (see also: previous turtle posts)

While this isn’t in Montana, I couldn’t pass up sharing these lovely photos.

It’s a steep learning curve to work on moose in Eastern Washington. Getting close to female moose and their calves during the most dangerous time of year is hard enough, add in their preference for the thick forests, high-elevations, and remote locations… and you have the recipe for tough, moose, fieldwork. Some days are unproductive, despite miles of driving and hiking, but others are filled with amazing and memorable experiences, such as viewing mother moose and their precious newborns. I am nearly finished confirming the presence of calves for the 25 radio-collared moose in my study area, but next year will be an even bigger challenge as there will be twice as many moose to track and monitor for reproduction and survival! Dealing with private landowners, timber companies, state agencies and other wildlife studies in the area has been complex and educational. As this first field season comes to a close, I find myself looking forward to seeing all these amazing animals again next year.

James Goerz, University of Montana student
Graduate Research Assistant
Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit